Pet Care Blog

By Murray Bridge Vet Clinic on Friday, 6 July 2018 6:22 AM
While cats confined to an indoor environment generally live longer and are at less risk for contracting infectious diseases or injuries, they are at greater risk of becoming overweight due to the lack of exercise. Providing your indoor cat with an enriched environment will increase physical activity and maintain a lean body weight. Here are some ideas to increase exercise for your indoor cat.



1. Walking outside on a lead and harness

Take your indoor cat outside to enjoy the sunshine while you hang the washing out or for a bit of one-on-one time together. Ensure your cat is secured with a harness and lead so he/she does not run away or chase any wildlife. Your cat will love the fresh air while getting some exercise.

2. Vertical Exercise

Cats love to climb and hide at high levels. Climbing is a great form of exercise for your indoor cat and provides great stimulation....
By Murray Bridge Vet Clinic on Sunday, 1 July 2018 12:36 PM
Winter time is here – that time of the year where we all seem to add a bit of extra food or treats to our beloved pooch’s bowls to ‘help keep them warm at night’! But have you had a close look at your furry friend - do they seem to be carrying around a little extra baggage? Do they seem to struggle with their breathing after walking around? Is their arthritis playing up more than normal? Or, have you noticed that their ribs can’t be seen when you look at them from afar? Obesity is a problem both young and old pets can face, especially if we are overfeeding or not feeding the best type of food. It can reduce your pet’s life span by an average of two years! Obesity in cats and dogs also increases the risk for many diseases. 

These diseases include:

Arthritis and joint issues Diabetes Breathing difficulties Heart problems Surgery complications Anaesthesia complications Constipation...
By Murray Bridge Vet Clinic on Wednesday, 20 June 2018 12:33 PM
With this cold weather here, you may start to notice your older pets becoming stiff and sore as the signs of  set in. Just like us, as we get older ( and the dreaded cooler weather hits), arthritis can sneak up on our pets. You may not have realised – just like with us, pets can have physical therapy to help relieve the pain and prevent the progression of arthritis.

One of our lovely nurses Amy has studied physical therapy and has come up with some simple exercises you can do with your pet at home to help to prevent the progression of arthritis.  And with the help of Amy’s beautiful Labrador Zara, we have created some videos to help demonstrate these easy techniques. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=09jb7ELxJL8

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By Murray Bridge Vet Clinic on Monday, 4 June 2018 8:37 AM

Brr..... It’s starting to feel like winter!

Now is the time for us to snuggle up in front of the fire place wearing our dressing gowns and uggboots,  sipping on warm hot chocolate. Sounds perfect doesn’t it?! ……but we can’t forget about our fur babies outside!  Especially our senior ones!  

By Murray Bridge Vet Clinic on Friday, 1 June 2018 1:20 PM
As dogs age a number of changes occur to their body, mind and personality. Here are some tips for all you fellow senior dog owners to help your arthritic dog feel emotionally happier throughout the cold miserable winter months…



Rather than skipping your dogs daily walk on the cold rainy days, feed his/her breakfast/diner in a food ball to encourage walking. Walking will also help to lubricate arthritic joints. Food puzzles help to stimulate the mind if walking is difficult. As warmth brightens the spirit, keep your dog cosy and warm by allowing him/her to sleep/rest inside out of the weather. Outdoors, position your dog’s bed near the back door, for a view of the...
By Murray Bridge Vet Clinic on Wednesday, 2 May 2018 3:06 PM


Do you have a pet who is 7 years or older? Did you know that dogs and cats are considered a senior pet from the age of 7?  As our pets grow old it is important that we give them a little extra love and care, as their bodies and immune systems are not what they used to be. Simple day to day things like; a good diet, gentle and regular exercise, comfort and warmth during the cooler months and disease prevention will help your pet live a long and happy life.

     

Here are some things to think about with your senior...
By Murray Bridge Vet Clinic on Tuesday, 1 May 2018 3:04 PM
Is your pet blind or does he/she have limited eye sight? Pets’ may be blind or lose eye sight for multiple reasons. They may be born blind, their eye sight may deteriorate with age, or they may become blind due to a medical condition or old age. Here are some ways you can assist your pet living with limited or no eye site.

Firstly if you suspect your pet is going blind, visit a vet for an examination to establish the reason for this. There may be treatment available to delay the blindness or you may get some valuable information on the condition your pet may have. Keep daily routines and furniture the same at home and don’t leave items on the ground that don’t belong (like the washing basket). Although pets have an incredible ability to adapt to change, despite limited or no eye sight, they will appreciate your assistance. Keep your pet safe from hazards and startling encounters. Be aware of other pets or children running up to greet your visually impaired pet. Intervene as they get...
By Murray Bridge Vet Clinic on Tuesday, 10 April 2018 8:31 PM
                                                          

 

Rat bait is designed to kill rats and mice, but it can also be deadly if eaten by your pets. Dogs may see rat bait as a smelly/tasty treat that has been left within their reach. Meanwhile, cats (in particular) may eat rodents that have recently been poisoned.

Poisoning with rat bait can cause your pet’s body to run out of vitamin K which normally helps to form clotting factors in the blood. This means that your pet’s blood will not be able to clot so even a small wound or bruise (internal bleed) could be life-threatening.

It is important to remember that signs of poisoning can take several days to appear after your pet has eaten rat bait. Owners often do not see their pets eat the bait, so it is important to check your pets regularly for signs, particularly if rat bait is being used on your property or surrounding properties.

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By Murray Bridge Vet Clinic on Monday, 2 April 2018 9:09 AM
Although our pets are unable to speak human language, they communicate to us in their own way through body language and behaviour. Have you ever wondered how a vet knows what is wrong with your pet? Although we would like to think they are ‘pet whisperers’ or ‘Dr Doolittle’s’, a large part of their diagnosis is based on assessing your pets behavioural response and body language.

If you notice that your pet’s behaviour is abnormal it may indicate a health condition or illness is present. It is important to be aware of what behaviours are ‘normal’ for your pet and especially when they change. By noticing subtle changes in your pet’s behaviour and acting early you may be able to start treatment earlier. In turn, saving your pet prolonged discomfort and potentially saving yourself money by getting onto treatment in early stages.

If you have any concerns about your pet’s behaviour or have noticed any changes whether drastic or subtle, please contact the veterinary clinic to discuss with one of the...
By Murray Bridge Vet Clinic on Wednesday, 28 March 2018 9:18 PM
                                                                        

Hey,

Me and my pooch are walking to fight animal cruelty on May 20th at the 2018 Million Paws Walk!

Why? Because last year, 33,535 animals arrived at RSPCA Shelters around Australia after suffering neglect, mistreatment or abuse. I believe ALL animals deserve a safe and happy home!

So I am asking for your support...

Click the link below to chip in and help me reach my goal:

https://www.millionpawswalk.com.au/fundraisers/profile/view/7613

My four legged friend and I will owe you one. :)

You are PAWsome!

P.S. All donations above $2 are tax deductible!

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 After Hours & Emergencies  08 8531 4000

Our comprehensive emergency service offers a veterinarian on call 24 hours every day of the year.

Telephone 0885 314 000 when the clinic is closed to hear a recorded message giving a phone number of the on call veterinarian.

Always phone first before rushing to the clinic with an injured animal or other emergency. An additional fee is charged outside normal clinic hours.