Pet Care Blog

By Murray Bridge Vet Clinic on Tuesday, 11 July 2017 1:28 PM
Meet Willis, our culprit of this month’s clinic blog!



Willis is an extremely inquisitive, exceptionally mischievous and a rather handsome young 2 year old Bull Terrier. Just look how innocent he looks in his picture…... However this is far from the truth!

This month we have been talking about bellies! We have spoken about Pancreatitis, GDV, dangerous foods and in particular gastrointestinal obstructions. Gastrointestinal obstructions are not uncommon. Our pets love to eat things they shouldn't and sometimes these things get stuck and cause them to become unwell. Dogs are particularly susceptible as they love to scavenge but cats may also ingest objects such as string or plastic wrapping. This is where Willis comes in! When we think of gastrointestinal obstruction, Willis definitely comes to mind and for good reason!

 Willis’s story:

Well…Although Willis has...
By Murray Bridge Vet Clinic on Tuesday, 4 July 2017 4:00 PM
 

Worried it might change your dogs behaviour or personality?.....

 

Are you struggling to make the choice about having your Desexed? It is a big decision, especially with all the talk about how it may change your dog’s behaviour or personality. I wanted to iron out some myths and help make the decision easier for you.

Firstly, there is no scientific evidence that the desexing surgery is linked to changing a dog’s personality. The only changes in your dog’s behaviour that you may witness after having him/her desexed is a calmer pet due to the reduced hormone drive. The instinct to mate and reproduce is intense in undesexed dogs, and can lead to all sorts of restless, frantic and even aggressive behaviours, whether escaping from your backyard, partaking in physical fights with other dogs or marking with urine. Your pet may behave in a much calmer manner after being desexed, not because his/her personality is suddenly transformed, but because his/her mind isn't constantly being...
By Murray Bridge Vet Clinic on Tuesday, 20 June 2017 12:33 PM
With this cold weather here, you may start to notice your older pets becoming stiff and sore as the signs of  set in. Just like us, as we get older ( and the dreaded cooler weather hits), arthritis can sneak up on our pets. You may not have realised – just like with us, pets can have physical therapy to help relieve the pain and prevent the progression of arthritis.

One of our lovely nurses Amy has studied physical therapy and has come up with some simple exercises you can do with your pet at home to help to prevent the progression of arthritis.  And with the help of Amy’s beautiful Labrador Zara, we have created some videos to help demonstrate these easy techniques. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O6qd1OctEQc

...
By Murray Bridge Vet Clinic on Sunday, 4 June 2017 8:37 AM

Brr..... It’s starting to feel like winter!

Now is the time for us to snuggle up in front of the fire place wearing our dressing gowns and uggboots,  sipping on warm hot chocolate. Sounds perfect doesn’t it?! ……but we can’t forget about our fur babies outside!  Especially our senior ones!  

By Murray Bridge Vet Clinic on Thursday, 1 June 2017 1:20 PM
As dogs age a number of changes occur to their body, mind and personality. Here are some tips for all you fellow senior dog owners to help your arthritic dog feel emotionally happier throughout the cold miserable winter months…



Rather than skipping your dogs daily walk on the cold rainy days, feed his/her breakfast/diner in a food ball to encourage walking. Walking will also help to lubricate arthritic joints. Food puzzles help to stimulate the mind if walking is difficult. As warmth brightens the spirit, keep your dog cosy and warm by allowing him/her to sleep/rest inside out of the weather. Outdoors, position your dog’s bed near the back door, for a view of the...
By Murray Bridge Vet Clinic on Tuesday, 2 May 2017 8:48 AM
Happy Mothers Day, Mum!

 

With mother’s day this month, it is an important time to not only show appreciation to all the human mothers out there but the 4-legged ones as well!

When a mother sees their child for the first time an instant bond is created that will last a life time. This is also true of the 4-legged furry kind. Seeing a mother interacting, caring, protecting and teaching her puppies is definitely something that melts the heart! We wanted to share with you all how beautiful, caring and smart our canine companions are and how alike they are to our own human mothers!

A mother’s everlasting bond begins from birth:

As each tiny puppy makes its way into the world, their mother is there for its first need.  The mother licks and cleans each tiny puppy helping to remove their placenta and stimulating their breathing. Like a human mother cuddles and gives her child their first feed, a mother dog curls tightly around her new litter keeping them protected and warm...
By Murray Bridge Vet Clinic on Thursday, 27 April 2017 11:01 AM

Getting ready for the Million Paws Walk? Here are some tips on loose lead walking.

By Murray Bridge Vet Clinic on Monday, 3 April 2017 9:14 AM
Like us dogs, dogs absolutely LOVE chocolate and they are extremely good at sniffing it out!  Here at the clinic one particular poodle comes to mind when we think of chocolate and chocolate toxicity.

                                          

Lila, our chocoholic poodle (pictured above) is no stranger to chocolate poisoning.

Lilla isn’t fussy with what chocolate she eats and loves all sorts of brands and flavours. She has devoured a whole KitKat Chunky, A full bag of family sized fruit chocs and a whole family block of milk chocolate…..Oh dear!!

Her owners try hard to keep the chocolate out of paws reach; however Lila sneaks into the pantry, climbs the shelves and helps herself to the chocolate. “If you have it in your mouth, she will try to lick it out” her owner has told us.

Luckily for Lila, her owners are extremely vigilant...
By Murray Bridge Vet Clinic on Saturday, 1 April 2017 10:14 AM
Do you take the opportunity on the Easter long weekend to go camping, perhaps taking your dog with you? Dogs often stress out when their routine changes, which can lead to erratic, even aggressive behaviour or illness. It is important to get them use to the scenarios they may encounter while camping, in the weeks leading up to your trip.

                                                       

-              Pitch your tent or pull out your camper in your back yard and spend time inside relaxing with your dog on their bed. Don't force your dog inside. Give your dog lots of attention with yummy treats and praise when your dog he/she chooses to come near the tent or joins you inside.

-              Take your dog for regular day trips for a few weeks prior to leaving. Pack your dog’s bed and food bowl you intend to use while camping. Try to replicate the situations...
By Murray Bridge Vet Clinic on Thursday, 23 March 2017 11:34 AM
Monthly Behaviour Tip

I DON’T UNDERSTAND…..



Dog behaviour whether ‘good’ or ‘bad’ largely comes down to the way in which the dog has been communicated with. Correct communication is the best tool to strengthen your relationship with your dog. As humans we often over complicate communication with our dog by chatting away to them like they are a fellow human, expecting our dog to understand. We need to remember that we have a complex verbal language. By recognising this, you can choose to communicate with your dog in a more effective way and in turn be rewarded for your efforts with a well behaved dog.

Often when your dog does not do as he/she is asked, you think he/she is choosing not to comply or ignoring you. It is simply that your dog does not fully understand the language that you are choosing to communicate with. Your dog’s ‘bad’...

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Telephone 08 8532 2333 when the clinic is closed to hear a recorded message giving a phone number of the on call veterinarian.

Always phone first before rushing to the clinic with an injured animal or other emergency. An additional fee is charged outside normal clinic hours.